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Social Media Notes: How Not To Tell Your Story

A few days ago Burger King posted this picture on it’s LinkedIn corporate page (40,628 followers as of this posting) here in an effort to highlight it’s “…Global Leadership Development Program 2014 class with CEO Daniel Schwartz and Executive Heitor Goncalves, during global on-boarding!”

It struck me as extremely bad on several levels.

In the digital age in which we live, how does a company as big as BK take such a lousy picture? Bad lighting, bad focus, etc.. The subject is in the background, not the foreground.

And what’s in the foreground? Four large messy tables!

Is this how a large, ‘successful’ fast-food chain tells it’s story? From two executives including the CEO of all people?!

How in the world do you not think that this is a metaphor for how they are training their managers to treat their dining rooms?

And don’t get me started on the word “Accountable” on the back wall.

This was a chance for a powerful message to be created around several issues that would have made a much more impactful statement about BK and their company’s efforts to train the next generation of managers. But…we got this instead.

Thoughts?

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Twitter & Restaurant Marketing: Some Numbers To Ponder

Speaking recently at the Digital Innovation Forum in London, Twitter’s Eimear Lambe threw out some numbers concerning restaurants and Twitter they had gleaned from surveying restaurant users on Twitter.  And while understanding them is important, the context for each individual operator is even more so.

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52% of Twitter users get some type of information about restaurants using Twitter.

The key here is ‘some type’.  The questions are: What information is the guest getting? Is it what they needed to make a visit decision? Or, is it just supportive information that helps keep them directed toward a positive decision about the restaurant? Was it negative information? What’s the ratio of positive to negative information? How do they weight the information they get?

There are seven tweets about a restaurant for every one TripAdvisor review.

However, Tweets are fleeting. That’s the point of twitter: immediacy. TripAdvisor reviews last and are aggregated by business. Tweets are not unless the business and the user do some work (consistent use of hashtags, messaging, monitoring etc…)

72% who tweet about a restaurant are actually leaving positive comments.

This is the part that is all but forgotten. You should be monitoring relevant platforms for these and aggregating/cataloging them to repurpose in your marketing. Making sure to use those that address unique points of your guest experience that have the most impact for each guest. This is one way to personalize your messaging.

78% of those who leave a negative comment are still in the restaurant while doing so.

This is an obviously unbelievable opportunity and also the greatest point of concern. The question for me is why are you seeing these on Twitter but not at the table and at the point of experience?

One in three Twitter users follow restaurants on Twitter.

The question is how many of your guests choose this or another platform to get information about your restaurant or others in your market? Is Twitter the preferred channel for them to receive communication or is it another one? How does this platform support their lifestyle? If they are on multiple platforms, how do they weight them? How much influence do these guests have with other guests?

52% of users on Twitter are more likely to visit a restaurant if some sort of discounted visit or promotion is tweeted about by the restaurant.

This is the lowest-common-denominator when it comes to guest’s motivation for making a choice. You need to understand the level of price sensitivity of your guests but more important is knowing the value drivers for those guests who would pay full-price for your experience. Those are who you should be targeting and creating for.

43% are attracted by pictures of its dishes.

Yet most operators do not have really good images to use – if they have any at all. Which amazes me because all operators understand that people eat with their eyes. Having the most appealing image of a dish should be as important as it is to costing it out.

39% are more likely to visit if people have tweeted about receiving great customer service at a restaurant.

The number dips because we know that all experiences are different and that past experiences are not necessarily good indicators of future experiences, but… Also, strangers who rave about a place are less important to us than those who are our friends and family. Which is important to know as you look for/to influencers among your guest segments.

79% are incentivised by a tweet about the food being great or positive information about the menu.

But incentivised to do what? Visit? Go look at your website? Read more Tweets about you? You have to remember that you need to create/leverage messages that funnel them toward a visit or recommendation.

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You Have Two Options:

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive, long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours or creates the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the contact form to talk about how we can help you realize an opportunity.

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5 Common Content Marketing Myths – BUSTED!

The popularity of content marketing has exploded, but a lot of content marketers are still ‘doing it wrong’.

We’ve busted 5 common myths so you can improve your content marketing and attract the audience you want.

1. Creating more content is the best strategy – BUSTED!

Google has always said that regular content is important. For a time there was an almost immediate correlation between simply putting up a page about a topic, and getting rankings and traffic for that topic. So the mantra became ‘create more content’.

Fortunately, that has changed. These days, in most commercial niches you have to do more than create content to dominate the search engine results. In fact creating an article named after your exact keyword, with lots of mentions of your keywords will be unlikely to outrank a higher quality article that isn’t perfectly targeted. Why?

Because Google is smart enough to know which article is higher quality. This is the case now and we can’t see this going backwards.

Consider the following chart of SEO ranking factors from Moz.

4 out of the top 6 factors are set to increase their weighting towards higher quality content:

  1. High quality content = a higher perceived value by the reader
  2. The writer with more authority will come out on top
  3. Social signals including shares, likes, retweets and +1s matter (better content gets more shares)
  4. The more readable the content is, the better

The days of bulk low quality content creation are over and our recommendation is to create specific, high quality content targeted at your audience.

If you already have great content, supercharge it using 6 things you should do right now instead of creating more content.

2. Vanity metrics are the best way to measure your content – BUSTED!

Some content marketers measure their success using metrics like views and shares. I know this because:

  • A number of the popular blogs identify their top posts by measuring the highest volume of visits or tweets.
  • Content marketing research identifies ‘traffic’ as the key indicator of success (see this research report and this research report).
  • My personal research of active content marketers tells me 45% track visits and only 5% track revenue.

In traditional web advertising, metrics like impressions, CTA and CPM are standard measurement metrics. Unfortunately, a lot of content marketers are looking for the same standardization for content marketing. And they are being drawn to easy numbers like views and tweet totals.

These do tell you something about the reach of your content but I believe there is a better approach (which is just as easy).

I’ve found the highest content marketing ROI with this approach:

  1. Use an email optin as the main call to action on your blog (this should give you enough conversion data to get some meaningful stats)
  2. Measure the conversions to email optin from people who landed on your blog posts
  3. Look at the conversion rate and conversion totals to work out which content is the most successful

This is broad advice, as the goals of particular content may differ. With that said, this is an easy metric to measure and it will force you into the habit of creating content that interests prospects enough to go to the next level.

Vanity metrics will make you feel good, but our recommendation is to focus on your conversions, not your popularity.

Our free C Metrics plugin will help you measure the conversion rate for each piece of content you create.

3. Content marketing is the same as traditional marketing – BUSTED!

Some people think content marketing is the same as traditional marketing. In the past, traditional marketers paid to get in front of people and then a small percentage of these people would make a purchase.

In my experience, content marketing works very differently. After 4 years of producing content on a regular basis, I can tell you that it is extremely rare for one piece of content to send me a customer directly.

Take a look at a recent WP Curve sign up for proof. This is a brief snapshot of the actual visits to a URL by a real customer, a week before signing up.

A more detailed history would show how this customer invested hours in reading our content, multiple optins for free downloads, downloads of free plugins plus regular blog and social media comments.

It’s important to understand how this works – you can’t simply deem a blog post to be successful because a lot of people read it. You can’t simply look at what posts created revenue because there will rarely be a correlation.

Content marketing is a long-term, trust building exercise which is very different to most methods of online or offline marketing.

4. If your content is great – it will go viral – BUSTED!

I know a number of content marketers who’s sole aim is for their content to go viral. I also know a few content marketers who have had their content go viral. And guess what. They don’t own yachts!

When something goes viral it appeals to the masses. There’s an important distinction here – small businesses typically don’t and probably shouldn’t have ‘the masses’ as their target customer.

If you get 5,000 people to read your blog post, that’s great! But let’s say that only 1 of the 5,000 is in your target market. Wouldn’t it be better to get 10 qualified prospects who are interested in your subject matter?

The problem with trying to ‘go viral’ is that you lose your content marketing focus. If you are creating content that you hope to go viral then you may not be creating content that appeals to your target customer.

You could lose months or years of building up subscriber lists that are irrelevant, building traffic that will never buy and engaging in feedback that isn’t from your target customers. Please don’t do this.

Sites like Hubspot and KissMetrics run this strategy because of the volume of visitors they attract over years. But if you’re not equipped to produce loads of content at their quality standard, then you will end up chasing your tail. A much better approach is to:

  1. Create content that solves real problems for prospects in your target market
  2. Build a loyal following among this community, so people who share your content are sharing it to people in the same target market
  3. Regularly speak to potential customers on your blog and using social media

5. Blogging = Content marketing – BUSTED!

Blogging and content marketing are not the same thing.

“Bloggers create blog posts. Content marketers create valuable things for potential customers” TWEET THIS

The reason why this distinction is important is because bloggers often have a background of bulk content creation. The first point of this post bears repeating – content marketing is not about creating a lot of content.

The Australian Football League (AFL – or greatest game in the world) are excellent content marketers. My team has it’s own TV show. That engages me, gets me more engrossed in the people and encourages me to watch more games and buy their hats.

The AFL produces at least 1 short video a day on their YouTube video every day during the week. This keeps AFL top of mind for me and when the weekend comes around, I know the main themes of the stories that are important the games. That makes me watch more games (and buy more hats).

They have an amazing mobile app that gives me all of the stats on the players, the ladder and all the latest news.

The AFL are selling a product. They know if they engage me with content, I will buy more of the product.

At WP Curve we do a number of things that help our potential customers that aren’t blog posts:

There are so many ways to create value for people, so think broader than blog posts.

What did I miss?

What myths do you think exist about content marketing? Let me know in the comments below.

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You Have Two Options:

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive, long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours or creates the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the contact form to talk about how we can help you realize an opportunity.

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Restaurant Marketing: Facebook Posts – Wolfgang Puck

I’m not a big fan of most operator’s Facebook pages (or social media usage in general). They are disproportionately pushy (coupons, discounts, contests, etc..) and usually have zero engagement beyond this single, marketing facet. However, I love how Wolfgang Puck uses Facebook (mostly) to drive deeper involvement of his guests. This one is such a post.

puck post

It is a feature that he runs whenever he gets a really good guest question about their menu, or food in general. Then he usually has Chef Ken answer it – in a video made just for the specific guest question.

It is from March 27th and they do a good job at keeping them fresh and up to date.

Is there promotion? Of course. But it’s balanced in favor of meaningful and unique content focusing on the guest first.

Now his website is rather anti-social, and he does do a very poor job of aggregating these Facebook videos on YouTube, as well as Google+. Which just goes to my usual point about using social platforms: Don’t get caught up in being everywhere. Be where your guests are – period, then be outstanding.

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You Have Two Options:shg guarantee

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive,
long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours.

Books, articles and DVD’s can create awareness, but only Coaching can create the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the form below to talk about how we can help you build the best business.

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Gary Vaynerchuk: THE Interview!

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You Have Two Options:shg guarantee

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive,
long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours.

Books, articles and DVD’s can create awareness, but only Coaching can create the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the form below to talk about how we can help you build the best business.

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Time to Grow Up! How Socially Mature Is Your Business? [infographic]

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You Have Two Options:shg guarantee

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive,
long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours.

Books, articles and DVD’s can create awareness, but only Coaching can create the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the form below to talk about how we can help you build the best business.

0

Game Change: Moneyball And The Reality Of Social Business

I’m not a big baseball fan but it held my interest, partly because it was based on a true story and partly because the movie really wasn’t about baseball at all. It was about old thinking vs. new thinking, about industry politics vs. the heresy of innovation, about dinosaurs desperate to hang on to a failing model that sustains their livelihood even when that model is clearly broken, ineffective and no longer relevant.

The scenes in which Oakland As’ general manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) locks horns with his cadre of coaches and scouts over how to do more with less, about how to break the cycle of mediocrity plaguing their organization, about how to get outcomes again is brilliant, not because of the writing or the acting but because it is spot on target. How do I know this? Because I have been in that meeting hundreds of times. Well, not that particular meeting, but in others exactly like it. And every week that goes by, I find myself sitting in that meeting again and again and again.

In the US, in Europe, in Asia, the same meeting goes on almost daily. The conference table is always basically the same, the fluorescent lighting too. The players, they’re the same as well, everywhere I go. Only the vocabulary changes, the industry lingo, but the meeting, it’s the same and it goes pretty much like this:


Billy Beane
: Guys, you’re just talking. Talking, “la-la-la-la”, like this is business as usual. It’s not.
Grady Fuson: We’re trying to solve the problem here, Billy.
Billy Beane: Not like this you’re not. You’re not even looking at the problem.
Grady Fuson: We’re very aware of the problem. I mean…
Billy Beane: Okay, good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: Look, Billy, we all understand what the problem is. We have to…
Billy Beane: Okay, good. What’s the problem?
Grady Fuson: The problem is we have to replace three key players in our lineup.
Billy Beane: Nope. What’s the problem?
Pittaro: Same as it’s ever been. We’ve gotta replace these guys with what we have existing.
Billy Beane: Nope. What’s the problem, Barry?
Scout Barry: We need 38 home runs, 120 RBIs and 47 doubles to replace.
Billy Beane: Ehh! [imitates buzzer]

What we see in this scene is a roomful of insiders with a century and a half of industry experience between them, and yet they haven’t figured out that their model is outdated, that their “experience,” is no longer enough to keep moving forward. They carry on day after day, season after season, doing the same thing over and over again, half-expecting a different result, but then again, maybe not. Worst of all, most of them have no idea what the problems plaguing their organizations actually are. A lot of it is just operational myopia. Some of it is also ego: they couldn’t possibly be wrong. All that experience and intuition, the entire industry’s decades-old model… how could things have changed that much, right?

And yet they are wrong, the model isn’t working anymore, and instead of listening to the guy in the room who sees it and knows how to fix it, they treat him like a punk. When he wants to do something about it, they push back. Hard. In Moneyball, he’s their boss. Imagine when he is just a Director or a VP, or even just an account manager. Imagine how quickly he gets overruled then. I’ve seen amazing people get shut down and pushed out of organizations over this sort of thing. I could give you names and dates. I could make you ill with true stories of stupidity and petty politics, of wasted opportunities and complete operational failures that turned what could have been huge wins for companies that needed them (and customers who demanded them) into case studies in wasted potential. And as tragic as  these stories would be, they are no different from the opportunities that will be wasted this week, and the next, and the one after that, always for the same reasons, always because of the exact same thinking and business management dynamics.

I see that scene, that meeting, that discussion being played out almost everywhere I go, especially when it comes to social media and social business: guys sitting around a table, treating social like it is just an extension of the same old traditional digital marketing game they all understand and desperately want to stick to. And so they make strategy decisions based on models that don’t apply at all to the social space, they insist on using measurement schemes that aren’t the least bit relevant to it or the business as a whole, and worst of all, they make hiring decisions that absolutely make no sense at all for the new requirements of social communications. Why? Because even though the game has changed, no one in the room wants to accept that it has. No one in the room wants to adapt. No one in the room wants to look reality in the eye and do what needs to be done to actually win. Talk about it, sure. Use cool new words like earned media and engagement, definitely. But actually change anything and adapt to a new model? Nope. Not happening. The change management piece that comes with social business integration, the piece that is absolutely vital to it actually working, that piece is still DOA.

Here’s another conversation that also goes on “offline” at every company (agency or brand) around the world right now in regards to hiring decisions that touch on social media management. Here it is again, through the filter ofMoneyball:

Peter Brand: There is an epidemic failure within the game to understand what is really happening. And this leads people who run Major League Baseball teams to misjudge their players and mismanage their teams. I apologize.
Billy Beane: Go on.
Peter Brand: Okay. People who run ball clubs, they think in terms of buying players. Your goal shouldn’t be to buy players, your goal should be to buy wins. And in order to buy wins, you need to buy runs. You’re trying to replace Johnny Damon. The Boston Red Sox see Johnny Damon and they see a star who’s worth seven and half million dollars a year. When I see Johnny Damon, what I see is… is… an imperfect understanding of where runs come from. The guy’s got a great glove. He’s a decent leadoff hitter. He can steal bases. But is he worth the seven and half million dollars a year that the Boston Red Sox are paying him? No. No. Baseball thinking is medieval. They are asking all the wrong questions. And if I say it to anybody, I’m-I’m ostracized. I’m-I’m-I’m a leper. So that’s why I’m-I’m cagey about this with you. That’s why I… I respect you, Mr. Beane, and if you want full disclosure, I think it’s a good thing that you got Damon off your payroll. I think it opens up all kinds of interesting possibilities.

Every company has a Peter Brand either on staff or sitting in a stack of CVs. Not necessarily in the sense that they are geniuses with statistics  but in the sense that they see the forest from the trees, that they see what needs to be done, but every time they open their mouths, they get shot down. Worse, if they open their mouths too much, they’re gone. And if their CV doesn’t have the bullet points and keywords that hiring managers were trained twenty years ago to find relevant, they don’t even get considered for the position.

If I see one more social media leadership position go by default to candidates with “big agency digital experience” or “big brand digital experience,” I am going to throw my pencil at somebody’s head. There is the medieval thinking in action, right there. There’s the primary reason why almost every social media program on the planet is failing to produce outcomes, why three fourths of companies still can’t figure out how to calculate the ROI of their social media programs, why most brands see less than 1% of engagement from their followers and fans after the first touch, why “content is king” is failing, and why increasingly, “social media” strategy and budgets are shifting to ad buys on social networks. That’s right: For all the talk about earned media and engagement and conversations, social media account roles are starting to go to media buyers now. (Here’s some insight into it.) Everyone loves to talk the talk. Almost no company is willing to actually walk the walk. That sound you’re hearing is the banging of traditional marketing hammers pounding nails into social business’ coffin.

You want to know why most big brand social media programs aren’t gaining real traction? Why they don’t work without a constant influx of ad spending? Why nobody sticks around when the “free iPads for likes” promotions are gone? Start there: no one in the room gets it. No one in the room wants to get it. And when someone in the room does get it, he or she doesn’t keep their job for very long. You think most companies are going to hire, promote and support change agents all on their own?

So the real question is this: Do you want to actually score some real wins or do you just want to spend big marketing budgets and play at being a digital big shot?

It’s a real question. In fact, it’s the most important question you might ask yourself all year. Because the answer to that question will determine whether or not you still have a job in two years. No wait… I misspoke. The answer to that question will determine whether or not you have the job you want in two years, and yes, there’s a difference. A big one.

When you find yourself looking for your next gig (and you will eventually,) do you want to just be the guy who was SVP digital at (insert big brand/agency here) or do you want to be the guy who took (insert big brand/agency here)’s theoretical social media and social business programs, and turned them into the new industry standards, into the business model that everyone will be copying and basing theirs on for the next decade? It’s a real question. Which guy do you want to be? The dinosaur or the pioneer? If the answer is the latter, then are you going to have the huevos to go against the grain? To take chances on whom you hire, what kinds of programs you launch, where and how you invest your budgets? Are you willing to stick your neck out and do it right? Or is it more likely that you’ll just play it safe, hoping that the system will just carry you for another decade or two, that the CEO or CMO you will interview with next won’t notice that your job was basically to spend ad dollars and shuffle digital board pieces for the CEO’s monthly show-and-tell meeting?

Who do you want to be? What do you want to build? Do you want to just wear the jersey or do you want to win? Hold that thought. Here’s another key piece of dialogue from the movie, after Billy Beane’s gamble has paid off, after he has started turning some wheels in a big way. He responds to an invitation from John Henry, owner of the Boston Red Sox, who tells him this:

John Henry: I know you’ve taken it in the teeth out there, but the first guy through the wall. It always gets bloody, always. It’s the threat of not just the way of doing business, but in their minds it’s threatening the game. But really what it’s threatening is their livelihoods, it’s threatening their jobs, it’s threatening the way that they do things. And every time that happens, whether it’s the government or a way of doing business or whatever it is, the people are holding the reins, have their hands on the switch. They go bat shit crazy. I mean, anybody who’s not building a team right and rebuilding it using your model, they’re dinosaurs. They’ll be sitting on their ass on the sofa in October, watching the Boston Red Sox win the World Series.

And a couple of years later, they did.

So let’s talk about our world again for a minute. Let’s talk about what’s coming, about tipping points, about momentum: Ford not only hired the right guy (Scott Monty) a few years back but gave him the authority to build a solid program there. The result: some serious wins on just about every front, from customer perceptions to purchase intent to customer loyalty and recommendations. Evencar design was impacted in 2010 by the importance of social communications in the Ford organization. Edelman Digital seems to be doing something similar (I keep running into some pretty solid folks there, notably Michael Brito and David Armano). Want to see something cool? This is one of the things they’re working on. Starbucks caught an early train with that too. So did Dell. What sucks is that in 2012, virtually no one else has even tried to keep up with them. For all the money being spent and all the “case studies” being pushed around the conference circuit, most companies are still fighting it, still refusing to accept that the game has changed – worse, trying to keep playing with old methods, with old thinking, with old, outdated skills and CV bullet points. But there will come a day when someone will be given the authority to build out this new model, when it will blow everyone out of the water, and when the blindfolds will have to come off. That day is coming. What side of change do you want to be on then?

Old thinking will not score wins here. Old tactics, old hiring, old measurement, they’re all wrong for these new marketing, communications and business models. They just don’t work anymore. If you don’t believe me, that’s fine. Keep watching your margins erode. Keep watching your digital dollars go to waste. Keep laying people off and outsourcing every last business function you can’t afford to keep in-house anymore. Keep pretending the world is the same today as it was five years ago, and that what you were doing five years ago will still be relevant five years from now. Whatever makes you feel best. Keep doing the same old thing that used to work, back before people carried smart phones and iPads. Keep thinking that the guy you just hired because he spent ten years managing digital for a fast-food brand knows fuck-all about building capacity and traction for a social media program, let alone produce concrete business outcomes for you. Keep coloring the same old boxes with the same old crayons and see how far you’ll get.

_ Okay good. What’s the problem?

We need to fill a VP Digital role.

_ Nope. What’s the problem?

All right… Whatever. We need to fill a VP social media strategy role.

_ Nope. What’s the problem?

We need to hire someone with proven global digital management experience, Billy. Someone with Disney or Nike on their CV. Someone with serious digital campaign experience.

_ Nope. What’s the problem, Barry?

The problem is, we’re not growing our Facebook community fast enough, and our content isn’t seeing the numbers we want. We need a…

_ Nope. [Imitates buzzer]

Get unstuck. Watch Moneyball and let the light bulb go off in your head. Then go find your Peter Brand and hire the shit out of him before someone else does. If you’re lucky, you’ll save both your career and your company in the process.

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An Interview With Guy Kawasaki: Enchantment [podcast]

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You Have Two Options:shg guarantee

  1. Grow your business.
  2. Make excuses.

Our powerful business programs are about helping you and your business master the fundamentals and create positive,
long-term opportunity. No other program(s) offers more value with the immediate impact or greater ROI than ours.

Books, articles and DVD’s can create awareness, but only Coaching can create the level of impacting and sustainable change necessary to grow your business.

Call Us Toll Free 888-998-8744 or use the form below to talk about how we can help you build the best business.

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